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Contact: Jennifer Gatti, 914-740-2100, jgatti@liebertpub.com
Gene Editing of Blood Stem Cells Can Correct Disease-Causing Mutations

New Rochelle, NY, September 23, 2016—Recent advances in gene editing technology, which allows for targeted repair of disease-causing mutations, can be applied to hematopoietic stem cells with the potential to cure a variety of hereditary and congenital diseases. Gene editing can overcome many of the obstacles associated with gene addition therapies, but this young field still faces many challenges before it is ready for human testing, as discussed in a Review article published in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Human Gene Therapy website until October 31, 2016.

The article entitled "Gene Editing of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells: Promise and Poten-tial Hurdles" is part of a special joint issue on stem cell gene therapy in Human Gene Therapy and Stem Cells & Development guest edited by Luigi Naldini, MD, Scientific Director, San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy, Milan, Italy.  A special "upside-down" print issue will be distributed at ESGCT/ISSCR Florence 2016 in October.

Kyung-Rok Yu, Hannah Natanson, and Cynthia Dunbar, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, describe how earlier gene addition strategies and the hurdles they encountered have informed the current development of gene editing approaches. The authors present the state-of-the-art in gene editing technology and the potential to apply these novel techniques to repair genetic flaws in hematopoietic stem cells, which give rise to the different types of cells in blood, and then to test those strategies in human clinical trials.
 
“Gene editing is the hottest new technology in gene therapy. The use of this approach to genetically modify hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is very promising, but requires a careful assessment," says Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Prov-ost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. “This mini-review by Dr. Dunbar’s group at NIH provides a very insightful analysis of recent advances and cur-rent limitations of this approach.”

About the Journal
Human Gene Therapy, the Official Journal of the European Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, French Society of Cell and Gene Therapy, German Society of Gene Therapy, and five other gene therapy societies, is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly in print and online. Led by Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Provost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Human Gene Therapy presents reports on the transfer and expression of genes in mammals, including humans. Related topics include improvements in vector development, delivery systems, and animal models, particularly in the areas of cancer, heart disease, viral disease, genetic disease, and neurological disease, as well as ethical, legal, and regulatory issues related to the gene transfer in humans. Its companion journals, Human Gene Therapy Methods, published bimonthly, focuses on the application of gene therapy to product testing and development, and Human Gene Therapy Clinical Development, published quarterly, features data relevant to the regulatory review and commercial development of cell and gene therapy products. Tables of contents for all three publications and a free sample issue may be viewed on the Human Gene Therapy website.

About the Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells and Development, and Cellular Reprogramming. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry’s most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm’s 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.