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Contact: Vicki Cohn, (914) 740-2156, vcohn@liebertpub.com
Increased Risk of Depression Linked to Mountaintop Coal Mining

New Rochelle, NY, October 10, 2013—People who live among the destructive environmental effects of mountaintop coal mining face an increased risk of major depression. The results of a study conducted in the coal mining regions of Central Appalachia that explored the relationship between psychological health and environmental degradation are published in Ecopsychology, a peer-reviewed, online journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Ecopsychology website.

Michael Hendryx (current affiliation Indian University, Bloomington) and Kestrel Innes-Wimsatt, West Virginia University, Morgantown, compared depressive symptoms among adults living in areas with and without mountaintop coal mining, a form of large-scale mining that uses explosives and heavy machinery to remove forests, rock and soil above coal seams, resulting in increased local air and water pollution. The authors present the relationship between these activities and the risk of mild, moderate, and severe depression in the article “Increased Risk of Depression for People Living in Coal Mining Areas of Central Appalachia.”

“Vital empirical data on the importance of nature for human wellbeing are presented in this timely study,” says Editor-in-Chief Peter H. Kahn, Jr., PhD, Professor, Department of Psychology and Director, Human Interaction With Nature and Technological Systems (HINTS) Lab, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Read this related article in Ecopsychology on mountain top removal coal mining “The Effects of Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining on Mental Health, Well-Being, and Community Health in Central Appalachia.” 

About the Journal
Ecopsychology, published quarterly online with Open Access options, is a peer-reviewed journal that seeks to reshape modern psychology by showing that it cannot stand apart from an intimate human connection with the natural environment. We need that connection with nature to do well mentally and physically, let alone to flourish, as individuals and as a species. Against this backdrop, the Journal publishes original scientific research articles, as well as theoretical papers, case studies, nature writing, and reviews of important books and other media. Complete tables of content and a sample issue are available on the Ecopsychology website.

About the Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Sustainability: The Journal of Record, Environmental Justice, and Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry’s most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm’s more than 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.