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Published Online: 7 July 2004

Validation of Laser Diffraction Method as a Substitute for Cascade Impaction in the European Project for a Nebulizer Standard

Publication: Journal of Aerosol Medicine
Volume 14, Issue Number 1

Abstract

The project for a European standard testing procedure to characterize nebulizers in terms of particle size distribution has been based on using the Andersen-Marple personal cascade impactor model 298 (A-MPCI) with a sodium fluoride reference solution. In the present study methods based on laser diffraction (Mastersizer-X) and time-of-flight (TOF)(APS®) and another cascade impactor (GS1-CI) were compared with the A-MPCI. Two types of nebulizer (Pari LC+® and Microneb®) were tested with all apparatuses, and a third type of nebulizer (NL9®) was tested with the A-MPCI and Mastersizer-X. Nebulizers were charged with a solution of sodium fluoride in conditions reproducing the European Committee for Normalization (CEN) protocol. There was no difference between the Mastersizer-X and the A-MPCI or between the GS1-CI and the A-MPCI in terms of mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD). Comparison between the APS® and the A-MPCI showed a significant difference with the Microneb®. The geometric standard deviations (GSD) obtained with the A-MPCI were on average 10% greater than GSD obtained with the other apparatuses, but the differences were not statistically significant. We conclude that laser diffraction can be used for particle size distribution in the context of the European standard, and that the Mastersizer-X is particularly interesting for industrial practice in view of its simplicity and robustness.

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Published In

cover image Journal of Aerosol Medicine
Journal of Aerosol Medicine
Volume 14Issue Number 1March 2001
Pages: 107 - 114
PubMed: 11495481

History

Published online: 7 July 2004
Published in print: March 2001

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    L. Vecellio None
    INSERM EMI-U 00-10, Groupe de Pneumologie, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, Cedex 1, France; ANTADIR, Paris, France
    D. Grimbert
    INSERM EMI-U 00-10, Groupe de Pneumologie, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, Cedex 1, France
    M.H. Becquemin, MD
    Service Central d'Explorations Fonctionnelles Respiratoires, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpétrière, UPRES 23-97, Paris, France
    E. Boissinot, MD
    INSERM EMI-U 00-10, Groupe de Pneumologie, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, Cedex 1, France
    A. Le Pape, PhD
    INSERM EMI-U 00-10, Groupe de Pneumologie, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, Cedex 1, France
    E. Lemarié, MD
    INSERM EMI-U 00-10, Groupe de Pneumologie, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, Cedex 1, France
    P. Diot, MD, PhD
    INSERM EMI-U 00-10, Groupe de Pneumologie, CHU Bretonneau, Tours, Cedex 1, France

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