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Published Online: 9 July 2004

Multilineage Cells from Human Adipose Tissue: Implications for Cell-Based Therapies

Publication: Tissue Engineering
Volume 7, Issue Number 2

Abstract

Future cell-based therapies such as tissue engineering will benefit from a source of autologous pluripotent stem cells. For mesodermal tissue engineering, one such source of cells is the bone marrow stroma. The bone marrow compartment contains several cell populations, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are capable of differentiating into adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic cells. However, autologous bone marrow procurement has potential limitations. An alternate source of autologous adult stem cells that is obtainable in large quantities, under local anesthesia, with minimal discomfort would be advantageous. In this study, we determined if a population of stem cells could be isolated from human adipose tissue. Human adipose tissue, obtained by suction-assisted lipectomy (i.e., liposuction), was processed to obtain a fibroblast-like population of cells or a processed lipoaspirate (PLA). These PLA cells can be maintained in vitro for extended periods with stable population doubling and low levels of senescence. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry show that the majority of PLA cells are of mesodermal or mesenchymal origin with low levels of contaminating pericytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Finally, PLA cells differentiate in vitro into adipogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and osteogenic cells in the presence of lineage-specific induction factors. In conclusion, the data support the hypothesis that a human lipoaspirate contains multipotent cells and may represent an alternative stem cell source to bone marrow-derived MSCs.

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Published In

cover image Tissue Engineering
Tissue Engineering
Volume 7Issue Number 2April 2001
Pages: 211 - 228
PubMed: 11304456

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Published online: 9 July 2004
Published in print: April 2001

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Patricia A. Zuk
Laboratory for Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair, Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
Min Zhu
Laboratory for Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair, Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
Hiroshi Mizuno
Laboratory for Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair, Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
Jerry Huang
Laboratory for Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair, Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
J. William Futrell
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Adam J. Katz
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Prosper Benhaim
Laboratory for Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair, Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
H. Peter Lorenz
Laboratory for Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair, Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
Marc H. Hedrick
Laboratory for Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair, Departments of Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California

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