Research Article
No access
Published Online: 6 January 2006

Sociodemographic Determinants of the Utilization of Specific Types of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: An Analysis Based on a Nationally Representative Survey Sample

Publication: Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Volume 11, Issue Number 6

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the relationships between selected sociodemographic factors and the use of particular types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the general U.S. population. CAMs make up a heterogeneous group of practices. Although it is well established that sociodemographic factors impact the use of conventional medicine, it is unclear which, if any, influence the use of particular types of CAM.
Design: Data from a 1997–1998 nationally representative survey (n = 2055) was examined using descriptive and univariate analyses.
Results: The impact of particular sociodemographic factors was found to vary by type of CAM considered. Whites used more CAM than non-Whites except in the case of prayer. Users of CAM tended to be better educated than nonusers with the exception of prayer, self-prayer, and use of a lay midwife. Women used more CAM than men, especially weight-change diet.
Conclusions: As with conventional medicine use, the patterns of CAM use vary by individual type of therapy considered. Analytically, grouping many heterogeneous practices into the CAM category hides important differences in use patterns.

Get full access to this article

View all available purchase options and get full access to this article.

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Volume 11Issue Number 6December 2005
Pages: 977 - 994
PubMed: 16398589

History

Published online: 6 January 2006
Published in print: December 2005

Permissions

Request permissions for this article.

Topics

Authors

Affiliations

Lisa Conboy, M.A., M.S., Sc.D.
Osher Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
Sonal Patel, M.D.
Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Boston, MA.
Ted J. Kaptchuk, O.M.D.
Osher Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
Bobbie Gottlieb, M.D.
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
David Eisenberg, M.D.
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
Delores Acevedo-Garcia, Sc.D.
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Metrics & Citations

Metrics

Citations

Export citation

Select the format you want to export the citations of this publication.

View Options

Get Access

Access content

To read the fulltext, please use one of the options below to sign in or purchase access.

Society Access

If you are a member of a society that has access to this content please log in via your society website and then return to this publication.

Restore your content access

Enter your email address to restore your content access:

Note: This functionality works only for purchases done as a guest. If you already have an account, log in to access the content to which you are entitled.

View options

PDF/EPUB

View PDF/ePub

Media

Figures

Other

Tables

Share

Share

Copy the content Link

Share on social media

Back to Top