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Published Online: 10 March 2011

High HIV Type 1 Group M pol Diversity and Low Rate of Antiretroviral Resistance Mutations Among the Uniformed Services in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Publication: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume 27, Issue Number 3

Abstract

For the first time the genetic diversity among the uniformed personnel in Kinshasa, the capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a country that has experienced military conflicts since 1998 and in which the global HIV-1/M pandemic started, has now been documented. A total of 94 HIV-1-positive samples, collected in 2007 in Kinshasa garrison settings from informed consenting volunteers, were genetically characterized in the pol region (protease and RT). An extensive diversity was observed, with 51% of the strains corresponding to six pure subtypes (A 23%, C 13.8%, D, G, H, J, and untypable), 15% corresponding to nine different CRFs (01, 02, 11, 13, 25, 26, 37, 43, and 45), and 34% being unique recombinants with one-third being complex mosaic viruses involving three or more different subtypes/CRFs. Only one strain harbored a single mutation, I54V, associated with drug resistance to protease inhibitors. Due to their high mobility and potential risk behavior, HIV infections in military personnel can lead to an even more complex epidemic in the DRC and to a possible increase of subtype C.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume 27Issue Number 3March 2011
Pages: 323 - 329
PubMed: 20954909

History

Published online: 10 March 2011
Published in print: March 2011
Published ahead of print: 18 October 2010

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Affiliations

Cyrille F. Djoko
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVF), San Francisco, California, and Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Biotechnology Center and Department of Biochemistry, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Anne W. Rimoin
UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, California.
Nicole Vidal
Laboratoire Retrovirus, UMR 145, Institute for Research and Development (IRD) and University of Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.
Ubald Tamoufe
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVF), San Francisco, California, and Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Nathan D. Wolfe
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVF), San Francisco, California, and Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Stanford University, Program in Human Biology, Stanford, California.
Christelle Butel
Laboratoire Retrovirus, UMR 145, Institute for Research and Development (IRD) and University of Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.
Matthew LeBreton
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVF), San Francisco, California, and Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Felix M. Tshala
Military Health Services, Ministry of Defence, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Patrick K. Kayembe
Kinshasa School of Public Health, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Jean Jacques Muyembe
National Institute for Biomedical Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Samuel Edidi-Basepeo
National AIDS Control Program Laboratory, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Brian L. Pike
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVF), San Francisco, California, and Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Joseph N. Fair
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVF), San Francisco, California, and Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Wilfred F. Mbacham
Biotechnology Center and Department of Biochemistry, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Karen E. Saylors
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVF), San Francisco, California, and Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Eitel Mpoudi-Ngole
IMPM, Ministry of Scientific Research and Innovation, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
Eric Delaporte
Laboratoire Retrovirus, UMR 145, Institute for Research and Development (IRD) and University of Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.
Department of Infectious Diseases, CHU, Montpellier, France.
Michael Grillo
Department of Defense HIV AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP), San Diego, California.
Martine Peeters
Laboratoire Retrovirus, UMR 145, Institute for Research and Development (IRD) and University of Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Martine PeetersUMR 145, IRD911 Avenue AgropolisBP 6450134394 Montpellier cedex 5,France
E-mail: [email protected]

Author Disclosure Statement

No competing financial interests exist.

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