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Published Online: 28 April 2010

Low Levels of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Blood of Diabetes Patients and Streptozotocin-Treated Rats Causes Vascular Inflammation?

Publication: Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
Volume 12, Issue Number 11

Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging as a physiological neuromodulator as well as a smooth muscle relaxant. We submit the first evidence that blood H2S levels are significantly lower in fasting blood obtained from type 2 diabetes patients compared with age-matched healthy subjects, and in streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats compared with control Sprague–Dawley rats. We further observed that supplementation with H2S or an endogenous precursor of H2S (l-cysteine) in culture medium prevents IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion in high-glucose–treated human U937 monocytes. These first observations led to the hypothesis that lower blood H2S levels may contribute to the vascular inflammation seen in diabetes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1333–1338.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
Volume 12Issue Number 11June 1, 2010
Pages: 1333 - 1337
PubMed: 20092409

History

Published in print: June 1, 2010
Published online: 28 April 2010
Published ahead of print: 21 January 2010
Accepted: 25 October 2009
Revision received: 25 October 2009
Received: 18 October 2009

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Affiliations

Sushil K. Jain
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Rebeca Bull
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Justin L. Rains
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Pat F. Bass
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Steven N. Levine
Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Sudha Reddy
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Robert McVie
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Joseph A. Bocchini, Jr.
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Dr. Sushil K. JainDepartment of PediatricsLSU Health Sciences CenterP.O. Box 339321501 Kings HighwayShreveport, LA 71130E-mail: [email protected]

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