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Published Online: 8 June 2011

Two-Component Mediated Peroxide Sensing and Signal Transduction in Fission Yeast

Publication: Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
Volume 15, Issue Number 1

Abstract

Two-component related proteins play a major role in regulating the oxidative stress response in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For example, the peroxide-sensing Mak2 and Mak3 histidine kinases regulate H2O2-induced activation of the Sty1 stress-activated protein kinase pathway, and the Skn7-related response regulator transcription factor, Prr1, is essential for activation of the core oxidative stress response genes. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which the S. pombe two-component system senses H2O2, and the potential role of two-component signaling in the regulation of Prr1. Significantly, we demonstrate that PAS and GAF domains present in the Mak2 histidine kinase are essential for redox-sensing and activation of Sty1. In addition, we find that Prr1 is required for the transcriptional response to a wide range of H2O2 concentrations and, furthermore, that two-component regulation of Prr1 is specifically required for the response of cells to high levels of H2O2. Significantly, this provides the first demonstration that the conserved two-component phosphorylation site on Skn7-related proteins influences resistance to oxidative stress and oxidative stress-induced gene expression. Collectively, these data provide new insights into the two-component mediated sensing and signaling mechanisms underlying the response of S. pombe to oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 153–165.

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cover image Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
Volume 15Issue Number 1July 1, 2011
Pages: 153 - 165
PubMed: 20919928

History

Published in print: July 1, 2011
Published online: 8 June 2011
Published ahead of print: 31 March 2011
Published ahead of production: 4 October 2010
Accepted: 2 October 2010
Revision received: 11 September 2010
Received: 1 June 2010

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Janet Quinn
*
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
Panagiota Malakasi*
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
Deborah A. Smith
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
Jill Cheetham
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
Vicky Buck
Division of Yeast Genetics, National Institute for Medical Research, London, United Kingdom.
Jonathan B.A. Millar
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
Brian A. Morgan
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Dr. Janet QuinnInstitute for Cell and Molecular BiosciencesFaculty of Medical SciencesNewcastle UniversityNewcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HHUnited Kingdom
E-mail: [email protected]
Prof. Brian A. MorganInstitute for Cell and Molecular BiosciencesFaculty of Medical SciencesNewcastle UniversityNewcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HHUnited Kingdom
E-mail: [email protected]

Authors Disclosure Statement

No competing financial interests exist.

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