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Published Online: 26 October 2012

Metabolic Brain Covariant Networks as Revealed by FDG-PET with Reference to Resting-State fMRI Networks

Publication: Brain Connectivity
Volume 2, Issue Number 5

Abstract

The human brain is inherently organized as separate networks, as has been widely revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Although the large-scale functional connectivity can be partially explained by the underlying white-matter structural connectivity, the question of whether the underlying functional connectivity is related to brain metabolic factors is still largely unanswered. The present study investigated the presence of metabolic covariant networks across subjects using a set of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F, FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) images. Spatial-independent component analysis was performed on the subject series of FDG-PET images. A number of networks that were mainly homotopic regions could be identified, including visual, auditory, motor, cerebellar, and subcortical networks. However, the anterior-posterior networks such as the default-mode and left frontoparietal networks could not be observed. Region-of-interest-based correlation analysis confirmed that the intersubject metabolic covariances within the default-mode and left frontoparietal networks were reduced as compared with corresponding time-series correlations using resting-state fMRI from an independent sample. In contrast, homotopic intersubject metabolic covariances observed using PET were comparable to the corresponding fMRI resting-state time-series correlations. The current study provides preliminary illustration, suggesting that the human brain metabolism pertains to organized covariance patterns that might partially reflect functional connectivity as revealed by resting-state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD). The discrepancy between the PET covariance and BOLD functional connectivity might reflect the differences of energy consumption coupling and ongoing neural synchronization within these brain networks.

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cover image Brain Connectivity
Brain Connectivity
Volume 2Issue Number 52012
Pages: 275 - 283
PubMed: 23025619

History

Published online: 26 October 2012
Published in print: 2012
Published ahead of production: 1 October 2012

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Xin Di
Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Height, Newark, New Jersey.
Bharat B. Biswal, and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
*
Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Height, Newark, New Jersey.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Bharat B. BiswalDepartment of Biomedical EngineeringNew Jersey Institute of Technology607 Fenster Hall, University HeightNewark, NJ, 07102E-mail: [email protected]

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No competing financial interests exist.

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