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Published Online: 23 March 2016

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder at Ages 13–18: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey—Adolescent Supplement

Publication: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume 26, Issue Number 2

Abstract

Objective: “Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder” (DMDD) has been introduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. but the utility of this new label and the clinical correlates of the children it describes are yet to be determined.
Methods: A proxy for the DMDD diagnosis was extracted from the National Comorbidity Survey - Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A) data on 6483 adolescents (51.4% female) including Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) diagnoses and measures of impaired functioning from the Sheehan Disability Scale. Cross tabulations and logistic regression were used to assess for prevalence and comorbidity.
Results: A total of 310 (5.26%) adolescents met the criteria for DMDD when diagnostic hierarchy and frequency of outbursts were not considered. At the low end of prevalence estimation, only nine adolescents (0.12%) met the most stringent proxy diagnosis, and they also met criteria for a number of comorbid disorders and functional impairment. The rates of comorbidity and functional impairment in adolescents with bipolar disorder were the same, irrespective of their meeting criteria for DMDD.
Conclusions: The DMDD diagnosis captures a small group of adolescents with multiple other psychiatric and neurologic conditions. The specificity of this diagnostic label, therefore, at least in adolescents, remains an open question.

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Published In

cover image Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume 26Issue Number 2March 2016
Pages: 107 - 113
PubMed: 26771536

History

Published online: 23 March 2016
Published in print: March 2016
Published ahead of print: 15 January 2016

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Robert R. Althoff, MD, PhD
The Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families, University of Vermont, College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont.
Eileen T. Crehan, BA
The Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families, University of Vermont, College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont.
Jian-Ping He, MD
Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
Marcy Burstein, PhD
Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
James J. Hudziak, MD
The Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families, University of Vermont, College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont.
Kathleen R. Merikangas, PhD
Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Notes

Funding: Data collection of the National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A) was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (U01-MH60220). Data analysis and writing was supported by National Institute of Mental Health (MH082116) and National Institute of Health Center of Biomedical Research Excellence award (P20GM103644) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Mental Health (Z01MH002808-08). The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and should not be construed to represent the views of any of the sponsoring organizations or agencies or the United States government.
Address correspondence to:Robert Althoff, MD, PhD364 SJ3 UVMMCBurlington, VT 05401E-mail: [email protected]

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No competing financial interests exist.

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