Research Article
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Published Online: 3 May 2005

Update: Establishing a Clinically Meaningful Predictive Model of Hematologic Toxicity in Nonmyeloablative Targeted Radiotherapy: Practical Aspects and Limitations of Red Marrow Dosimetry

Publication: Cancer Biotherapy & Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume 20, Issue Number 2

Abstract

In either heavily pretreated or previously untreated patient populations, dosimetry holds the promise of playing an integral role in the physician's ability to adjust therapeutic activity prescriptions to limit excessive hematologic toxicity in individual patients. However, red marrow absorbed doses have not been highly predictive of hematopoietic toxicity. Although the accuracy of red marrow dose estimates is expected to improve as more patient-specific models are implemented, these model-calculated absorbed doses more than likely will have to be adjusted by parameters that adequately characterize bone marrow tolerance in the heavily pretreated patients most likely to receive nonmyeloablative radiolabeled antibody therapy. Models need to be established that consider not only absorbed dose but also parameters that are indicative of pretherapy bone marrow reserve and radiosensitivity so that a clinically meaningful predictive model of hematologic toxicity can be established.

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cover image Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals
Cancer Biotherapy & Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume 20Issue Number 2April 2005
Pages: 126 - 140
PubMed: 15869446

History

Published online: 3 May 2005
Published in print: April 2005

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    Jeffry A. Siegel
    Nuclear Physics Enterprises, Wellington, FL.

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