Research Article
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Published Online: 13 December 2010

A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of In Virtuo and In Vivo Exposure for Spider Phobia

Publication: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume 13, Issue Number 6

Abstract

The present study compared the efficacy of virtual reality (VR) in virtuo exposure and in vivo exposure in the treatment of spider phobia. Two treatment conditions were compared to a waiting-list condition. A 3-month follow-up evaluation was conducted in order to assess the durability of the treatment effects. Participants were randomly assigned to the treatment groups. A total of 16 participants received the in virtuo treatment, and 16 received the in vivo treatment. The waiting-list condition included 11 participants. Participants received eight 1.5-hour treatment sessions. Efficacy was measured with the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire, the Spider Beliefs Questionnaire (SBQ-F), and a Behavioral Avoidance Test (BAT). In addition, a clinician administered the Structured Interview for DSM-IV to assess DSM-IV's criteria for specific phobia and severity. Clinical and statistically significant improvements were found for both groups. Differences in treatment groups were found on one of five measures of fear: greater improvement on the SBQ-F beliefs subscale was associated with in vivo exposure.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume 13Issue Number 6December 2010
Pages: 689 - 695
PubMed: 21142994

History

Published online: 13 December 2010
Published in print: December 2010
Published ahead of print: 3 May 2010

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Authors

Affiliations

David Michaliszyn
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
André Marchand
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Centre de recherche Fernand-Séguin, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Stéphane Bouchard
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, Canada.
Marc-Olivier Martel
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Joannie Poirier-Bisson
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Notes

Address correspondence to:David MichaliszynDepartment of PsychologyUniversité du Québec à MontréalCase Postale 8888Succursale Centre-VilleMontréalQuébec H3C 3P8Canada
E-mail: [email protected]

Disclosure Statement

No competing financial interests exist.

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