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Published Online: 17 August 2013

Perpetration of Teen Dating Violence in a Networked Society

Publication: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume 16, Issue Number 8

Abstract

Teen dating violence (TDV) is a serious form of youth violence that youth fairly commonly experience. Although youth extensively use computer-mediated communication (CMC), the epidemiology of CMC-based TDV is largely unknown. This study examined how perpetration of psychological TDV using CMC compares and relates to perpetration using longer-standing modes of communication (LSMC; e.g., face-to-face). Data from the national Growing up with Media study involving adolescents aged 14–19 collected from October 2010 to February 2011 and analyzed May 2012 are reported. Analyses focused on adolescents with a history of dating (n=615). Forty-six percent of youth daters had perpetrated psychological TDV. Of those who perpetrated in the past 12 months, 58% used only LSMC, 17% used only CMC, and 24% used both. Use of both CMC and LSMC was more likely among perpetrators who used CMC than among perpetrators who used LSMC. In addition, communication mode and type of psychological TDV behavior were separately related to frequency of perpetration. Finally, history of sexual intercourse was the only characteristic that discriminated between youth who perpetrated using different communication modes. Results suggest that perpetration of psychological TDV using CMC is prevalent and is an extension of perpetration using LSMC. Prevention should focus on preventing perpetration of LSMC-based TDV as doing so would prevent LSMC as well as CMC-based TDV.

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Notes

a. We consider a phone call via cell phone one of the longer-standing modes of communication because, although it occurs via a newer technology, it is essentially the same as a phone call via landline phone.
b. This and the following percentages are corrected for survey weights.

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Published In

cover image Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume 16Issue Number 8August 2013
Pages: 561 - 567
PubMed: 23790358

History

Published online: 17 August 2013
Published in print: August 2013
Published ahead of print: 21 June 2013

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Josephine D. Korchmaros, PhD
Center for Innovative Public Health Research, Inc., San Clemente, California.
Southwest Institute for Research on Women, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.
Michele L. Ybarra, MPH, PhD
Center for Innovative Public Health Research, Inc., San Clemente, California.
Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, PhD
Psychology Department, University of Southern Alabama, Mobile, Alabama.
danah boyd, PhD
Microsoft Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Amanda Lenhart, MA
Pew Research Center, Washington, District of Columbia.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Dr. Josephine D. KorchmarosSouthwest Institute for Research on WomenUniversity of Arizona181 S, Tucson Blvd., Ste. 101Tucson, AZ 85716E-mail: [email protected]

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No competing financial interests exist.

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