Abstract

The Drosophila suzukii invasion of western countries has created an immense agricultural and economic threat to crop production. Despite many attempts to suppress its population, D. suzukii continues to destroy soft-flesh fruits. Precision guided sterile insect technique (pgSIT) utilizes the accuracy of programmable CRISPR gene targeting to generate sterilized males that can be deployed to suppress populations. Here, we generate pgSIT in D. suzukii and empirically and mathematically demonstrate that sterilized males are fit, competitive, and can eliminate populations of D. suzukii. Altogether, we describe an efficient way to generate sterile D. suzukii for release and safe effective population suppression.

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Published In

cover image GEN Biotechnology
GEN Biotechnology
Volume 1Issue Number 4August 2022
Pages: 372 - 385

History

Published online: 18 August 2022
Published in print: August 2022
Accepted: 29 June 2022
Received: 12 May 2022

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    Authors

    Affiliations

    School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
    These authors contributed equally to this work.
    School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
    These authors contributed equally to this work.
    Anna Buchman
    School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
    Verily Life Sciences, South San Francisco, California, USA
    These authors contributed equally to this work.
    School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
    Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Divisions of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
    Natalie Warsinger-Pepe
    School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
    Ting Yang
    School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
    Amarish K. Yadav
    Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
    Maxwell J. Scott
    Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
    John M. Marshall
    Divisions of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
    Innovative Genomics Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.
    Omar S. Akbari* [email protected]
    School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA

    Notes

    *
    Address correspondence to: Omar S. Akbari, School of Biological Sciences, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA, [email protected]

    Author Disclosure Statement

    The authors declare the following competing interests. N.P.K. and O.S.A. have submitted a patent application on this technology. O.S.A. is a co-founder of Agragene, Inc., and Synvect, Inc., with an equity interest. N.P.K. is a co-founder of Synvect with an equity interest. The terms of this arrangement have been reviewed and approved by the University of California, San Diego in accordance with its conflict of interest policies. All remaining authors declare no competing interests.

    Funding Information

    This work was supported in part by funding California Cherry Board and Washington Tree Fruit Board (#19-CCB5400-06), Agragene (#200779) awarded to O.S.A., National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture Specialty Crops Research Initiative under agreement No. 2015-51181-24252 awarded to M.J.S., and by funds from the Innovative Genomics Institute at UC Berkeley awarded to J.M.M.

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