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Published Online: 19 December 2011

Willingness to Pay for Genetic Testing for Alzheimer's Disease: A Measure of Personal Utility

Publication: Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers
Volume 15, Issue Number 12

Abstract

Background: The increased availability of genetic tests for common, complex diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), raises questions about what people are willing to pay for these services. Methods: We studied willingness-to-pay for genetic testing in a study of AD risk assessment that included APOE genotype disclosure among 276 first-degree relatives of persons with AD. Results: Seventy-one percent reported that they would ask for such testing from their doctor if it were covered by health insurance, and 60% would ask for it even if it required self-pay. Forty-one percent were willing to pay more than $100 for testing, and more than half would have been willing to pay for the test out of pocket. Participants who learned that they were APOE ɛ4 positive and those who had higher education were less likely to want testing if covered by insurance, possibly to avoid discrimination. Conclusion: This is the first report to examine willingness to pay for susceptibility genetic testing in a sample of participants who had actually undergone such testing. These findings reveal that some participants find valuable personal utility in genetic risk information even when such information does not have proven clinical utility.

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cover image Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers
Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers
Volume 15Issue Number 12December 2011
Pages: 871 - 875
PubMed: 21749214

History

Published online: 19 December 2011
Published in print: December 2011
Published ahead of print: 12 July 2011

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Ilona M. Kopits
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
Clara Chen
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
J. Scott Roberts
University of Michigan Health System and School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Wendy Uhlmann
University of Michigan Health System and School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Robert C. Green
Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Robert C. Green, M.D., M.P.H.Division of Genetics, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolSuite 301, 41 Avenue Louis PasteurBoston, MA 02115E-mail: [email protected]

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No authors have any conflicts of interest.

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