Research Article
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Published Online: 9 July 2020

Antiproliferative Activity of Olive Extract Rich in Polyphenols and Modified Pectin on Bladder Cancer Cells

Publication: Journal of Medicinal Food
Volume 23, Issue Number 7

Abstract

Bladder cancer (BC) is one of the most common human cancers. There is an interest in controlling and treating BC and other types of cancer via the use of natural substances and/or combination chemotherapy. Modified forms of pectin have been reported to possess anticancer bioactivity related to the interaction of galactosyl, a main component of pectin, with galectin-3, a carbohydrate-binding protein that is overexpressed on many types of cancer cells. In this study, the antiproliferative effect on BC of novel modified pectins extracted from olives was evaluated. Pectoliv extracts, with high polyphenol content associated to polysaccharides rich in pectin, exhibited an important antiproliferative capacity in vitro against four human BC cells lines, RT112, T24, J82, and SCaBER. Pectoliv treatment reduced the expression of galectin-1 and galectin-3 and significantly inhibited the agglutination of erythrocytes. Thus, Pectoliv may have the potential for development as a novel galectin-3 inhibitor.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image Journal of Medicinal Food
Journal of Medicinal Food
Volume 23Issue Number 7July 2020
Pages: 719 - 727
PubMed: 31939715

History

Published online: 9 July 2020
Published in print: July 2020
Published ahead of print: 15 January 2020
Accepted: 7 October 2019
Received: 19 June 2019

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Authors

Affiliations

Alejandra Bermúdez-Oria [email protected]
Department of Food Phytochemistry, Fat Institute (Spanish National Research Council, CSIC), Seville, Spain.
Translational Oncology Laboratory, Lucio Lascaray Ikergunea Research Center, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
Guillermo Rodríguez-Gutiérrez
Department of Food Phytochemistry, Fat Institute (Spanish National Research Council, CSIC), Seville, Spain.
Fátima Rubio-Senent
Department of Food Phytochemistry, Fat Institute (Spanish National Research Council, CSIC), Seville, Spain.
Marta Sánchez-Carbayo
Translational Oncology Laboratory, Lucio Lascaray Ikergunea Research Center, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
Juan Fernández-Bolaños
Department of Food Phytochemistry, Fat Institute (Spanish National Research Council, CSIC), Seville, Spain.

Notes

Address correspondence to: Alejandra Bermúdez-Oria, Department of Food Phytochemistry, Instituto de la Grasa (Spanish National Research Council, CSIC), Ctra. de Utrera km. 1, Pablo de Olavide University Campus, Building 46, Seville 41013, Spain, [email protected]

Author Disclosure Statement

The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Funding Information

This research was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness, and cofunded by a European Social Fund (ESF) (Ramon y Cajal Programme RyC 2012-10456; project AGL2013-48291-R and project AGL2016-79088-R). A. Bermúdez-Oria received funding from the Spanish FPI program (MEIC) (BES-2014-068508). This work was part of the Bemúdez-Oria's thesis and that it has been deposited to an online repository.

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