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Published Online: 11 December 2014

Implementation Science and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System

Publication: Journal of Women's Health
Volume 23, Issue Number 12

Abstract

This paper describes the restructuring of the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), a surveillance system of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Division of Reproductive Health conducted for 25 years in collaboration with state and city health departments. With the ultimate goal to better inform health care providers, public health programs, and policy, changes were made to various aspects of PRAMS to enhance its capacity on assessing and monitoring public health interventions and clinical practices in addition to risk behaviors, disease prevalence, comorbidities, and service utilization. Specifically, the three key PRAMS changes identified as necessary and described in this paper are questionnaire revision, launching the web-based centralized PRAMS Integrated Data Collection System, and enhancing the access to PRAMS data through the web query system known as Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's PRAMS Online Data for Epidemiologic Research/PRAMStat. The seven action steps of Knowledge To Action cycle, an illustration of the implementation science process, that reflect the milestones necessary in bridging the knowledge-to-action gap were used as framework for each of these key changes.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image Journal of Women's Health
Journal of Women's Health
Volume 23Issue Number 12December 2014
Pages: 989 - 994
PubMed: 25405525

History

Published online: 11 December 2014
Published in print: December 2014
Published ahead of print: 18 November 2014

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    Authors

    Affiliations

    Violanda I. Grigorescu, MD, MSPH
    Applied Sciences Branch, Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
    Denise V. D'Angelo, MPH
    Applied Sciences Branch, Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
    Leslie L. Harrison, MPH
    Applied Sciences Branch, Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
    Aspy J. Taraporewalla, MS, PMP
    Applied Sciences Branch, Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
    Holly Shulman, MS
    Applied Sciences Branch, Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
    Ruben A. Smith, PhD, MS
    Applied Sciences Branch, Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

    Notes

    Address correspondence to:Violanda I. Grigorescu, MD, MSPHApplied Sciences BranchDivision of Reproductive HealthNational Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionCenters for Disease Control and Prevention4770 Buford HighwayAtlanta, GA 30341E-mail: [email protected]

    Author Disclosure Statement

    No conflicts of interest or financial disclosures were reported by the authors of this paper.

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