Research Article
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Published Online: 1 September 2016

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Decreases Broadband Power in Area CA1

Publication: Journal of Neurotrauma
Volume 33, Issue Number 17

Abstract

Cognitive impairment caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to devastating consequences for both patients and their families. The underlying neurological basis for TBI-induced cognitive dysfunction remains unknown. However, many lines of research have implicated the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of TBI. In particular, past research has found that theta oscillations, long thought to be the electrophysiological basis of learning and memory, are decreased in the hippocampus post-TBI. Here, we recorded in vivo electrophysiological activity in the hippocampi of 16 mice, 8 of which had previously undergone a TBI. Consistent with previous data, we found that theta power in the hippocampus was decreased in TBI animals compared to sham controls; however, this effect was driven by changes in broadband power and not theta oscillations. This result suggests that broadband fluctuations in the hippocampal local field potential can be used as an electrophysiological surrogate of abnormal neurological activity post-TBI.

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Published In

cover image Journal of Neurotrauma
Journal of Neurotrauma
Volume 33Issue Number 17September 1, 2016
Pages: 1645 - 1649
PubMed: 26529412

History

Published in print: September 1, 2016
Published online: 1 September 2016
Published ahead of print: 1 February 2016
Published ahead of production: 3 November 2015

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Authors

Affiliations

Rosalia Paterno
Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Hannah Metheny
Joseph Stoke's Research Institute, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Anesthesiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Guoxiang Xiong
Joseph Stoke's Research Institute, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Anesthesiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Jaclynn Elkind
Joseph Stoke's Research Institute, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Anesthesiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Akiva S. Cohen
Joseph Stoke's Research Institute, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Anesthesiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Department of Anesthesiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Akiva S. Cohen, PhDDepartment of Anesthesiology and Critical Care MedicinePerelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaChildren's Hospital of PhiladelphiaAbramson Research CenterRoom 816-h3615 Civic Center BoulevardPhiladelphia, PA 19104-4399E-mail: [email protected]

Author Disclosure Statement

No competing financial interests exist.

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