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Published Online: 28 December 2005

Cell Preservation in Reparative and Regenerative Medicine: Evolution of Individualized Solution Composition

Publication: Tissue Engineering
Volume 10, Issue Number 11-12

Abstract

The expanding complexity of biologics banked for therapeutic applications necessitates the development of improved preservation technologies for support of the emerging fields of reparative and regenerative medicine. Currently, a number of media or "solutions" are utilized for the preservation of biologics. Given the diversity of cell systems utilized in the regenerative medicine arena, we hypothesized that the development of unique (individualized) preservation solutions designed to meet the distinct molecular biological requirements of individual systems would provide for enhanced and extended preservation. To evaluate this hypothesis, coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs), coronary artery endothelial cells (CAECs), hepatic cells (C3A), and skeletal muscle cells (SKMCs) were hypothermically preserved for 2 to 7 days at 4°C in either cell culture medium, University of Wisconsin Solution (UW or ViaSpan), or HypoThermosol (HTS) variants. Cells were then assayed for viability, using the alamarBlue assay as well as calcein-AM, subsequent to their return to normothermic (37°C) temperatures for up to 5 days. CASMC viability was best maintained when preserved in HTS plus Trolox/EDTA, CAEC viability was highest when preserved in HTS plus Trolox, SKMCs stored in HTS plus Trolox/RGD demonstrated enhanced viability, and C3A cells were best preserved in HTS plus FK041. The data suggest that solution compositions that address the differences in cell death mechanisms limiting preservation efficacy can result in targeted improvement matched to specific cell types. These observations support the custom solution hypothesis of cell and tissue preservation.

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cover image Tissue Engineering
Tissue Engineering
Volume 10Issue Number 11-12November/December 2004
Pages: 1662 - 1671
PubMed: 15684675

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Published online: 28 December 2004
Published in print: November/December 2004

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Aby J. Mathew
Institute of Biomedical Technology, State University of New York, Binghamton, New York.
BioLife Solutions, Owego, New York.
John M. Baust
Institute of Biomedical Technology, State University of New York, Binghamton, New York.
BioLife Solutions, Owego, New York.
Robert G. Van Buskirk
Institute of Biomedical Technology, State University of New York, Binghamton, New York.
BioLife Solutions, Owego, New York.
John G. Baust
Institute of Biomedical Technology, State University of New York, Binghamton, New York.
BioLife Solutions, Owego, New York.

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