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Published Online: 31 October 2011

Response of Human Engineered Cartilage Based on Articular or Nasal Chondrocytes to Interleukin-1β and Low Oxygen

Publication: Tissue Engineering Part A
Volume 18, Issue Number 3-4

Abstract

Previous studies showed that human nasal chondrocytes (HNC) exhibit higher proliferation and chondrogenic capacity as compared to human articular chondrocytes (HAC). To consider HNC as a relevant alternative cell source for the repair of articular cartilage defects it is necessary to test how these cells react when exposed to environmental factors typical of an injured joint. We thus aimed this study at investigating the responses of HNC and HAC to exposure to interleukin (IL)-1β and low oxygen. For this purpose HAC and HNC harvested from the same donors (N=5) were expanded in vitro and then cultured in pellets or collagen-based scaffolds at standard (19%) or low oxygen (5%) conditions. Resulting tissues were analyzed after a short (3 days) exposure to IL-1β, mimicking the initially inflammatory implantation site, or following a recovery time (1 or 2 weeks for pellets and scaffolds, respectively). After IL-1β treatment, constructs generated by both HAC and HNC displayed a transient loss of GAG (up to 21.8% and 36.8%, respectively) and, consistently, an increased production of metalloproteases (MMP)-1 and -13. Collagen type II and the cryptic fragment of aggrecan (DIPEN), both evaluated immunohistochemically, displayed a trend consistent with GAG and MMPs production. HNC-based constructs exhibited a more efficient recovery upon IL-1β withdrawal, resulting in a higher accumulation of GAG (up to 2.6-fold) compared to the corresponding HAC-based tissues. On the other hand, HAC displayed a positive response to low oxygen culture, while HNC were only slightly affected by oxygen percentage. Collectively, under the conditions tested mimicking the postsurgery articular environment, HNC retained a tissue-forming capacity, similar or even better than HAC. These results represent a step forward in validating HNC as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering strategies.

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Published In

cover image Tissue Engineering Part A
Tissue Engineering Part A
Volume 18Issue Number 3-4February 2012
Pages: 362 - 372
PubMed: 21902467

History

Published in print: February 2012
Published ahead of print: 4 November 2011
Published online: 31 October 2011
Published ahead of production: 8 September 2011
Accepted: 13 June 2011
Received: 26 April 2011

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Celeste Scotti
Departments of Surgery and of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Andrea Osmokrovic
Departments of Surgery and of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Francine Wolf
Departments of Surgery and of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Sylvie Miot
Departments of Surgery and of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Giuseppe M. Peretti
Department of Sport Sciences, Nutrition and Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.
Andrea Barbero
Departments of Surgery and of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Ivan Martin
Departments of Surgery and of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Notes

Address correspondence to:Andrea Barbero, Ph.D.Institute for Surgical Research and Hospital ManagementHebelstrasse 20University Hospital Basel4031 BaselSwitzerland
E-mail: [email protected]

Disclosure Statement

No competing financial interests exist.

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