Research Article
No access
Published Online: 2 January 2013

The Effect of Caffeine on Performance in Collegiate Tennis Players

Publication: Journal of Caffeine Research
Volume 2, Issue Number 3

Abstract

Background: This study examined the efficacy of caffeine supplementation on tennis performance. The effect of a CYP1A2 polymorphism on the ergogenic response to caffeine was also investigated.
Methods: Collegiate tennis players (eight men and eight women) completed two performance trials after the ingestion of either 6 mg/kg of caffeine or a placebo, provided in a double-blind fashion. The trials consisted of 45 minutes of intermittent treadmill exercise (TM; intended to mimic the intensities of game play), followed immediately by a tennis skill test (TST, which accessed stroke accuracy). Average ratings of perceived exertion and heart rate (HR) were recorded during TM and TST. DNA was obtained from whole blood and analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with allele-specific primers. Subjects were classified as AA homozygotes (n=7) or C allele carriers (n=9). Data were analyzed via repeated measures analysis of variance.
Results: Caffeine significantly (p<0.05) improved the number of successful shots during the TST (2.1%; caffeine=295±11 shots; placebo=289±10 shots), but performance was not influenced by the genotype. There was a strong trend (p=0.052) suggesting a genotype×treatment interaction for HR during the TST, as caffeine raised HR in the AA homozygotes (placebo=149±13 beats/min; caffeine=155±17 beats/min), but not the C allele carriers (placebo=153±16 beats/min; caffeine=150±16 beats/min).
Conclusion: Caffeine supplementation positively impacts tennis performance in collegiate tennis players. There may be preliminary support for a greater physiological effect of caffeine in AA homozygotes, though this had no apparent influence on tennis performance.

Get full access to this article

View all available purchase options and get full access to this article.

References

1.
Anselme FCollomp KMercier BAhmaidi SPrefaut C. Caffeine increases maximal anaerobic power and blood lactate concentrationEur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol201065188-191. 1. Anselme F, Collomp K, Mercier B, Ahmaidi S, Prefaut C. Caffeine increases maximal anaerobic power and blood lactate concentration. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 2010;65:188–191.
2.
Bell DGJacobs IEllerington K. Effect of caffeine and ephedrine ingestion on anaerobic exercise performanceMed Sci Sports Exerc2001331399-1403. 2. Bell DG, Jacobs I, Ellerington K. Effect of caffeine and ephedrine ingestion on anaerobic exercise performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001;33:1399–1403.
3.
Bell DGMcLellan TM. Effect of repeated caffeine ingestion on repeated exhaustive exercise enduranceMed Sci Sports Exerc2003351348-1354. 3. Bell DG, McLellan TM. Effect of repeated caffeine ingestion on repeated exhaustive exercise endurance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35:1348–1354.
4.
Bruce CRAnderson MEFrasher SF et al. Enhancement of 2000-m rowing performance after caffeine ingestionMed Sci Sports Exerc2000321958-1963. 4. Bruce CR, Anderson ME, Frasher SF, et al. Enhancement of 2000-m rowing performance after caffeine ingestion. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000;32:1958–1963.
5.
Collomp KAhmaidi SChatard JCAudran MPrefaut CH. Benefits of caffeine ingestion on sprint performance in trained and untrained swimmersEur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol199264377-380. 5. Collomp K, Ahmaidi S, Chatard JC, Audran M, Prefaut CH. Benefits of caffeine ingestion on sprint performance in trained and untrained swimmers. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992;64:377–380.
6.
Cox GRDesbrow BMontgomery PG et al. Effect of different protocols of caffeine intake on metabolism and endurance performanceJ Appl Physiol200293990-999. 6. Cox GR, Desbrow B, Montgomery PG, et al. Effect of different protocols of caffeine intake on metabolism and endurance performance. J Appl Physiol. 2002;93:990–999.
7.
Denadai BSDenadai ML. Effects of caffeine on time to exhaustion in exercise performed below and above the anaerobic thresholdBraz J Med Biol Res199831581-585. 7. Denadai BS, Denadai ML. Effects of caffeine on time to exhaustion in exercise performed below and above the anaerobic threshold. Braz J Med Biol Res. 1998;31:581–585.
8.
Doherty M. The effects of caffeine on the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit and short-term running performanceInt J Sports Nutr1998895-104. 8. Doherty M. The effects of caffeine on the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit and short-term running performance. Int J Sports Nutr. 1998;8:95–104.
9.
Graham TEHibbert ESathasivam P. Metabolic and exercise endurance effects of coffee and caffeine ingestionJ Appl Physiol199885883-889. 9. Graham TE, Hibbert E, Sathasivam P. Metabolic and exercise endurance effects of coffee and caffeine ingestion. J Appl Physiol. 1998;85:883–889.
10.
Kovacs EMStegen JHCHBrouns F. Effect of caffeinated drinks on substrate metabolism, caffeine excretion, and performanceJ Appl Physiol199885709-715. 10. Kovacs EM, Stegen JHCH, Brouns F. Effect of caffeinated drinks on substrate metabolism, caffeine excretion, and performance. J Appl Physiol. 1998;85:709–715.
11.
Meyers BMCafarelli E. Caffeine increases time to fatigue by maintaining force and not by altering firing rates during submaximal isometric contractionsJ Appl Physiol2005991056-1063. 11. Meyers BM, Cafarelli E. Caffeine increases time to fatigue by maintaining force and not by altering firing rates during submaximal isometric contractions. J Appl Physiol. 2005;99:1056–1063.
12.
Schneiker KTBishop DDawson BHackett LP. Effects of caffeine on prolonged intermittent-sprint ability in team-sport athletesMed Sci Sports Exerc200638578-585. 12. Schneiker KT, Bishop D, Dawson B, Hackett LP. Effects of caffeine on prolonged intermittent-sprint ability in team-sport athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006;38:578–585.
13.
Hornery DJFarrow DMujika IYoung WB. Caffeine, carbohydrate, and cooling use during prolonged simulated tennisInt J Sports Physiol Perform20072423-438. 13. Hornery DJ, Farrow D, Mujika I, Young WB. Caffeine, carbohydrate, and cooling use during prolonged simulated tennis. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2007;2:423–438.
14.
Ferrauti AWeber KStruder HK. Metabolic and ergogenic effects of carbohydrate and caffeine beverages in tennisJ Sports Med Phys Fitness199737258-366. 14. Ferrauti A, Weber K, Struder HK. Metabolic and ergogenic effects of carbohydrate and caffeine beverages in tennis. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1997;37:258–366.
15.
Sachse CBrockmoller JBauer SRoots I. Functional significance of a C→A polymorphism in intron 1 of the cytochrome P450 CYP1A2 gene tested with caffeineBr J Clin Pharmacol199947445-449. 15. Sachse C, Brockmoller J, Bauer S, Roots I. Functional significance of a C→A polymorphism in intron 1 of the cytochrome P450 CYP1A2 gene tested with caffeine. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1999;47:445–449.
16.
Womack CJSaunders MJBechtel MK et al. The influence of a CYP1A2 on the ergogenic effects of caffeineJ Int Soc Sports Nutr201297-13. 16. Womack CJ, Saunders MJ, Bechtel MK, et al. The influence of a CYP1A2 on the ergogenic effects of caffeine. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012;9:7–13.
17.
Mayo ClinicHow much caffeine is in your daily habit? [Online]www.mayoclinic.com/health/caffeine/AN01211October292008. 17. Mayo Clinic. How much caffeine is in your daily habit? [Online]. www.mayoclinic.com/health/caffeine/AN01211 (accessed October 29 2008).
18.
Grosso LMBracken MB. Caffeine metabolism, genetics, and prenatal outcomes: a review of exposure assessment considerations during pregnancyAnn Epidemiol200515460-466. 18. Grosso LM, Bracken MB. Caffeine metabolism, genetics, and prenatal outcomes: a review of exposure assessment considerations during pregnancy. Ann Epidemiol. 2005;15:460–466.
19.
Fernandez JMendez-Villanueva APluim B. Intensity of tennis match playBr J Sports Med200640387-391. 19. Fernandez J, Mendez-Villanueva A, Pluim B. Intensity of tennis match play. Br J Sports Med. 2006;40:387–391.
20.
Konig DHuonker MSchmid AMartin HAloys BKuel J. Cardiovascular, metabolic, and hormonal parameters in professional tennis playersMed Sci Sports Exerc200133654-658. 20. Konig D, Huonker M, Schmid A, Martin H, Aloys B, Kuel J. Cardiovascular, metabolic, and hormonal parameters in professional tennis players. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001;33:654–658.
21.
Cornelis MCEl-Sohemy ACampos H. Genetic polymorphism of CYP1A2 increases the risk of myocardial infarctionJ Med Genet200441758-762. 21. Cornelis MC, El-Sohemy A, Campos H. Genetic polymorphism of CYP1A2 increases the risk of myocardial infarction. J Med Genet. 2004;41:758–762.
22.
Cornelis MCEl-Sohemy AKabagambe EKCampos H. Coffee, CYP1A2 genotype, and risk of myocardial infarctionJAMA20062951135-1141. 22. Cornelis MC, El-Sohemy A, Kabagambe EK, Campos H. Coffee, CYP1A2 genotype, and risk of myocardial infarction. JAMA. 2006;295:1135–1141.
23.
Hallstrom HMelhus HGlynn ALind LSyvanen ACMichaelsson K. Coffee consumption and CYP1A2 genotype in relation to bone mineral density of the proximal femur in elderly men and women: a cohort studyNutr Metab2010712-20. 23. Hallstrom H, Melhus H, Glynn A, Lind L, Syvanen AC, Michaelsson K. Coffee consumption and CYP1A2 genotype in relation to bone mineral density of the proximal femur in elderly men and women: a cohort study. Nutr Metab. 2010;7:12–20.
24.
Ganio MSKlau JFCasa DJArmstrong LEMaresh CM. Effect of caffeine on sport-specific endurance performance: a systematic reviewJ Strength Cond Res200923315-324. 24. Ganio MS, Klau JF, Casa DJ, Armstrong LE, Maresh CM. Effect of caffeine on sport-specific endurance performance: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res. 2009;23:315–324.
25.
Doherty MSmith PM. Effects of caffeine ingestion on exercise testing: a meta-analysisInt J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab200414626-616. 25. Doherty M, Smith PM. Effects of caffeine ingestion on exercise testing: a meta-analysis. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2004;14:626–616.
26.
Graham TE. Caffeine and exercise: metabolism, endurance, and performanceSports Med200131785-807. 26. Graham TE. Caffeine and exercise: metabolism, endurance, and performance. Sports Med. 2001;31:785–807.
27.
Sawynok J. Adenosine receptor activation and nociceptionEur J Pharmacol19983171-11. 27. Sawynok J. Adenosine receptor activation and nociception. Eur J Pharmacol. 1998;317:1–11.
28.
Motl RWO'Connor PJDishman RK. Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exerciseJ Pain20034316-321. 28. Motl RW, O'Connor PJ, Dishman RK. Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. J Pain. 2003;4:316–321.
29.
Doherty MSmith PMHughes MGDavison R. Caffeine lowers perceptual response and increases power output during high-intensity cyclingJ Sports Sci200422637-643. 29. Doherty M, Smith PM, Hughes MG, Davison R. Caffeine lowers perceptual response and increases power output during high-intensity cycling. J Sports Sci. 2004;22:637–643.
30.
James JERogers PJ. Effects of caffeine on performance and mood: withdrawal reversal is the most plausible explanationPsychopharmacology20051821-8. 30. James JE, Rogers PJ. Effects of caffeine on performance and mood: withdrawal reversal is the most plausible explanation. Psychopharmacology. 2005;182:1–8.

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image Journal of Caffeine Research
Journal of Caffeine Research
Volume 2Issue Number 3September 2012
Pages: 111 - 116

History

Published online: 2 January 2013
Published ahead of print: 4 September 2012
Published in print: September 2012

Permissions

Request permissions for this article.

Topics

    Authors

    Affiliations

    Courtney S. Klein
    Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
    Adam Clawson
    Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
    Michael Martin
    Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
    Michael J. Saunders
    Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
    Judith A. Flohr
    Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
    Marta K. Bechtel
    Department of Biology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia
    Wade Dunham
    Department of Biology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia
    Melyssa Hancock
    Department of Biology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia
    Christopher J. Womack
    Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.

    Notes

    Address correspondence to:Christopher J. Womack, PhDHuman Performance LaboratoryDepartment of Kinesiology, MSC 2302James Madison University261 Bluestone Dr.Harrisonburg, VA 22807E-mail: [email protected]

    Author Disclosure Statement

    No competing financial interests exist.

    Metrics & Citations

    Metrics

    Citations

    Export citation

    Select the format you want to export the citations of this publication.

    View Options

    Get Access

    Access content

    To read the fulltext, please use one of the options below to sign in or purchase access.

    Society Access

    If you are a member of a society that has access to this content please log in via your society website and then return to this publication.

    Restore your content access

    Enter your email address to restore your content access:

    Note: This functionality works only for purchases done as a guest. If you already have an account, log in to access the content to which you are entitled.

    View options

    PDF/EPUB

    View PDF/ePub

    Full Text

    View Full Text

    Media

    Figures

    Other

    Tables

    Share

    Share

    Copy the content Link

    Share on social media

    Back to Top